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General John G. Coburn recently was appointed Commander of the Army Materiel Command. General Coburn, who previously served as Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, replaces General Johnnie E. Wilson, who has retired from the Army. Major General Charles S. Mahan, Jr., has been nominated as the Army's new Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics.
GENERAL JOHN G. COBURN
General John G. Coburn recently was appointed Commander of the Army Materiel Command. General Coburn, who previously served as Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, replaces General Johnnie E. Wilson, who has retired from the Army. Major General Charles S. Mahan, Jr., has been nominated as the Army's new Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics.

 

ALOG CELEBRATES 30 YEARS IN PRINT

Army Logistician observed its 30th year of publication this year by printing a special anniversary issue for January-February 1999. At the request of General Coburn, then Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, the issue was devoted to the "Revolution in Military Logistics." The actual anniversary of this professional bulletin is marked by the issue you are reading. The first issue was dated September-October 1969.

This issue is the 181st printing of Army Logistician, and it represents a major milestone for the staff. As we begin our 31st year, we want to thank our readers and contributors for their continued support. We anticipate many more years of providing you with accurate and up-to-date logistics information.

ODCSLOG CLARIFIES FUTURE MAINTENANCE POLICY

Major General Julian A. Sullivan, Jr., Director of Supply and Maintenance, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics (ODCSLOG), recently sent a letter to Army Logistician that explains a major change in maintenance policy. This change will be incorporated in AR 750-1, Army Materiel Maintenance Policies and Retail Management Operations. To read General Sullivan's letter, return to index, Letter from Major General Julian A. Sullivan, Jr..

MTMC ADOPTS WEB-BASED FREIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

The Military Traffic Management Command (MTMC) has developed a plan to meet the Deputy Secretary of Defense directive to reengineer defense transportation documentation and financial processes. The plan includes implementation of the commercial payment and reconciliation system used by U.S. Bank—PowerTrack—for making transportation payments and the continental U.S. (CONUS) Freight Management (CFM) System Electronic Transportation Acquisition (ETA) suite of Internet-based applications for managing freight services. The system will be fully implemented within the next year.

Training for the new transportation management system began in May at Fort Eustis, Virginia, for 32 Army transportation officers from high-volume freight sites. The 1-week course provides hands-on, computer-based training on the entire suite, including ETA Freight Acquisition Shipping Tool (FAST), Spot Bid and Transportation Discrepancy Reports (TDR's), Transportation Facility Guide (TFG), Carrier Added Value Suite (CAVS), and PowerTrack. Upon completing the course, students are issued passwords to access ETA/Power Track upon return to their duty stations.

Most other users will be trained using distance learning tools, including self-paced CD's, a live Internet simulator, on-line tutorials, and Internet classroom training. Limited classroom instruction will continue to be offered at Fort Eustis.

For more information on ETA, visit the MTMC website at http://www.mtmc.army.mil/transys/cfm, call (703) 696-8762, extension 2062, or send e-mail to henryc@mtmc.army.mil.

NEW TRANSPORTATION OFFICER COURSE AVAILABLE ON WEB

The Army Transportation School at Fort Eustis, Virginia, has developed a new Senior Transportation Officer Qualification Course (STOQC) as a web-based training program. The course is on the school's website, http://www.transchool.eustis.army.mil. The previous version of the STOQC has been deleted from DA Pamphlet 351-20, Army Correspondence Course Program Catalog.

STOQC provides field-grade non-Transportation Corps officers (both active and reserve component [AC and RC]) with a working knowledge of the duties and responsibilities of a Transportation Corps officer operating at the battalion level or higher. The course will branch-qualify RC officers and familiarize AC officers from other branches who have been assigned to a transportation staff position or transferred to the Transportation Corps. Also, it will branch-qualify non-Transportation Corps RC officers who have been selected to command a transportation unit. In addition to the STOQC, at least 1 year of documented experience in a transportation position is required to branch-qualify in transportation.

There are two versions of STOQCa highway/rail track and a marine/terminal track. Officers select the appropriate track during the enrollment process.

For more information, call (757) 878-6928 or DSN 927-6928, send e-mail to westp@eustis.army.mil, or visit the Transportation School's website.

ENGINEERING DRAWINGS LISTED ON INTERNET

Logisticians, engineers, and maintenance personnel who need technical drawings to ensure that Department of Defense (DOD) weapon systems and spare parts are ready when they need them now can locate and generate a request for engineering data on the World Wide Web.

The Military Engineering Data Asset Locator System (MEDALS), DOD's central index for engineering data since 1988, has been upgraded from a mainframe system to a midtier graphic user interface design that is accessible from the World Wide Web. The new web-enabled query capability allows users to locate engineering drawings using a browser, such as Microsoft's Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator. MEDALS identifies the locations of engineering data for users and indicates whether they are available digitally online or on compact disk, aperture card, hardcopy, or mylar.

Although engineering data are not available online, MEDALS gives users all the information they need to download it themselves from systems such as DOD's standard Joint Engineering Data Management Information and Control System. However, MEDALS does support a feature permitting users to generate an electronic drawing order request for technical drawings that are available in offline media, such as compact disk, aperture card, hard copy, and mylar. MEDALS electronically sends the orders to the appropriate technical data repository for processing.

MEDALS indexes more than 26 million DOD technical drawings and saves the Government approximately $6 million annually by cutting storage costs, preventing duplicate purchases of engineering data, and saving procurement and management time. In the past, it sometimes took weeks to locate technical data; MEDALS locates this information in seconds.

For more information, visit the Defense Logistics Information Service's MEDALS website at http://www.dlis.dla.mil/MEDALS, or contact the MEDALS program manager at (616) 961-4068. Send e-mail inquiries to medals@dlsc.dla.mil.

ARMY MAINTAINERS RECOGNIZED

Despite a high pace of operations, Army equipment readiness has never been better. That was the conclusion of General Dennis J. Reimer, then Chief of Staff of the Army, as he recognized the Army's best maintenance units for 1999.

During a Pentagon ceremony in May, General Reimer thanked the award winners for their long hours, personal sacrifices, and work done in austere conditions. "You are doing a great job," he said.

As an example of austere conditions, General Reimer described one of his favorite pictures as that of a "Humvee" stuck in the mud in Albania with a soldier's legs and boots sticking out from under it. "That was a maintainer working on that Humvee. That is where the rubber meets the road and the wrenches meet the steel."

Units receiving the Army Chief of Staff Award for Maintenance Excellence were—

Active Army (Modification Table of Organization and Equipment )

Light. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Signal Brigade, Mannheim, Germany, Army Forces Command.

Intermediate. 58th Signal Company, Mannheim, Germany, Army Forces Command.

Heavy. 324th Signal Company, Mannheim, Germany, U.S. Army, Europe.

Active Army (Table of Distribution and Allowances)

Light. Ground Mobility Division, 1st Battalion, 81st Armor Regiment, Fort Knox, Kentucky, Army Training and Doctrine Command.

Intermediate. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 111th Military Intelligence Brigade, Fort Huachuca, Arizona, Army Training and Doctrine Command.

Heavy. 751st Military Intelligence Battalion, Camp Humphries, South Korea, Army Intelligence and Security Command.

Army Reserve

Light. 942d Transportation Company, North Charleston, South Carolina, Army Forces Command.

Intermediate. 425th Transportation Company, Salina, Kansas, Army Forces Command.

Heavy. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 479th Engineer Battalion, Watertown, New York, Army Forces Command.

Army National Guard

Light. 210th Finance Battalion, Jackson, Mississippi, Mississippi Army National Guard.

Intermediate. 1086th Transportation Company, Jena, Louisiana, Louisiana Army National Guard.

Heavy. 527th Engineer Battalion, Ruston, Louisiana, Louisiana Army National Guard.

CODING SIMPLIFIES "GREEN" PURCHASES

Thanks to an initiative undertaken by military supply managers and the Defense Logistics Agency, the Department of Defense (DOD) has a new coding system for all Federal supplies that will make it easier for Government workers to purchase environment-friendly products.

All Federal agencies, as well as manufacturers, commercial producers, and a number of foreign governments, use the Federal Logistics Information System (FLIS) as a reference source. The FLIS is a computerized list of more than seven million supply items covering everything from office supplies to military hardware. In addition to tracking national stock numbers for Federal supply purchases, the FLIS offers guidance on acquiring, storing, distributing, transporting, using, and disposing of items used by the Government.

Supply managers will update the FLIS with codes that show which stock items meet or exceed environmental guidelines set by organizations such as the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy. New environment-friendly product codes will be added to the list as they are developed and identified.

"This initiative will save the American taxpayers millions of dollars by encouraging DOD purchasers to buy products that are more energy efficient and environmentally sound," said Sherri Goodman, Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Environmental Security. "It will encourage our people to make better use of environmentally oriented products, including recycled items and items able to be recycled."

Goodman explained that the DOD has a strong commitment to purchasing "green" products. She said, "With our large purchasing power, we can play an important role in helping create a bigger market for environmentally-oriented products."

More information on this effort can be found at the website for the Joint Group on Environmental Attributes at http://www.jgenvatt.dla.mil, or from the Defense Logistics Information Service website at http://www.dlis.dla.mil.

Customers located 10 to 50 miles from the 98th Area Support Group self-service supply center (SSSC) in Wurzburg, Germany, now can call in an order to the SSSC and have it delivered within 24 hours. The SSSC began delivery service in July 1998 with delivery to three installations. The program now serves 650 delivery accounts with 642 line items and saves the Army $35,000 per month in personnel, vehicle maintenance, and fuel costs. Above, SSSC personnel load supplies for delivery to a customer.  

Customers located 10 to 50 miles from the 98th Area Support Group self-service supply center (SSSC) in Wurzburg, Germany, now can call in an order to the SSSC and have it delivered within 24 hours. The SSSC began delivery service in July 1998 with delivery to three installations. The program now serves 650 delivery accounts with 642 line items and saves the Army $35,000 per month in personnel, vehicle maintenance, and fuel costs. Above, SSSC personnel load supplies for delivery to a customer.

LEADERSHIP MANUAL ISSUED

The new Field Manual (FM) 22-100, Army Leadership, provides an easy-to-understand framework for developing leadership built on Army values; places more emphasis on the total Army, including civilians; takes cultural diversity into consideration; and includes leadership at all levels.

The leadership manual was revised for the first time in almost a decade. It consolidates and supersedes doctrine found in the 1990 version of FM 22-100, Military Leadership; FM 22-101, Leadership Counseling; FM 22-102, Soldier Team Development; FM 22-103, Leadership and Command at Senior Levels; and DA Pam 600-80, Executive Leadership.

The pre-publication version of the manual is available on the World Wide Web at www.fm22-100.army.mil. The hard copy manuals will be distributed to units in August. For more information, contact the Center for Army Leadership by e-mail at fm22100@leav-emh1.army.mil.

LOG MANAGERS SET CONFERENCE DATE

The annual conference of the Council of Logistics Management (CLM) will be held 17 through 20 October at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The theme of this year's conference will be "Enhancing Global Relationships: Passport to the Future." Registration closes on 1 October. For more information, visit the CLM home page, http://www.clm1.org, or call (630) 574-0985.

TITANIUM STRENGTHENS TANK ARMOR

The Army has developed new protective armor for M1A2 Abrams tanks using titanium metal converted from the Defense National Stockpile Center's stock of titanium sponge. The titanium armor provides added ballistic protection while reducing the overall weight of the tank by 10 percent (or 5 to 6 tons). Possible titanium components include the turret blowoff plates, armor side skirts, parts of the commander's hatch, and the gunner's primary sight cover.

The titanium armor can be used not only on new equipment but also to upgrade current equipment. Resulting weight reductions will permit installation of new equipment designed to improve soldier survivability and lethality.

Titanium is a strong, lightweight metal with high corrosion and erosion resistance. These factors, plus its availability from the Defense National Stockpile Center, make it a choice, affordable means of addressing equipment weight-reduction requirements.

Plans are currently underway to use titanium in other Army equipment such as M2/3 Bradley fighting vehicles, Stinger and Sidewinder missiles, and the new lightweight 155-millimeter field howitzer.

ELECTRONICS VANS UPGRADED

Sheet metal mechanics, electricians, and electronics technicians from Tobyhanna Army Depot, Pennsylvania, are modernizing 66 communications-electronics vans for units at Fort Carson, Colorado, and Fort Hood, Texas. Installing the $115,000 electronics kits in the vans will add 10 years to their life span.

Five-ton expandable vans are used as command and control centers, many of them by the 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized) at Fort Hood, the Army's first digitized division. Tobyhanna experts are removing all of the electronics equipment, racks, wiring, entry boxes, and electrical fixtures from the vans. They are installing a new power and signal entry with local area network capability, video interfaces, telephone and fiber optic/tactical fiber optic cable assemblies, new racks, map boards, antenna mounts, and workstations. A new AC power distribution box sends power to outlets, workstations, environmental control units, and lights. A DC power distribution box provides power to various radios. The floor is being reinforced, and a weapons rack is being added.

The upgrade kits were designed and fabricated at Tobyhanna. A five-member team of two electricians, two sheet metal mechanics, and one electronic technician installs the kits on site, a process that takes about 2 weeks.

CBC's SOLVE EQUIPMENT SECURITY PROBLEMS

The family of cargo bed covers (CBC's) offers an inexpensive, secure, and readily deployable solution to the transportability and equipment security problems on tactical vehicles. CBC's are lightweight, rigid, and easily mounted on tactical vehicles and trailers (see photo above right). They can be modified with electrical outlets to increase their utility. Previously, soldiers used standard bows and canvas or constructed makeshift plywood covers for storing equipment on vehicles and trailers. These structures offered no security and only limited protection from the elements. They often failed transportability standards and frequently were discarded before deployment.

The CBC-equipped vehicle conforms to all requirements for ground, air, and sea transportation. Covers will be available to fit the following vehicles and trailers—

• High-mobility, multipurpose, wheeled vehicle (HMMWV).

• 2-ton M35A2 truck/light mobile tactical vehicle (LMTV) and LMTV trailer.

• 5-ton M923A2 truck/mobile tactical vehicle (MTV) and MTV trailer.

• 1-ton M105A2 trailer.

The family of CBC's was developed by the Soldier Center of Excellence (formerly the Army Natick Research, Development, and Engineering Center) and managed by PM-Soldier Support in Natick, Massachusetts. For more information about CBC's, visit the Natick web- site at http://www-sscom.army.mil, or send e-mail to jdoucet@natick-emh2.army.mil.

The family of cargo bed covers (CBC's) offers an inexpensive, secure, and readily deployable solution to the transportability and equipment security problems on tactical vehicles. CBC's are lightweight, rigid, and easily mounted on tactical vehicles and trailers .

FIBRIN BANDAGE COULD SAVE LIVES

Scientists of the Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and clinicians of the Army Medical Command, working with the American Red Cross, have developed a dry fibrin sealant bandage that could save lives by controlling bleeding on the battlefield.

The fibrin sealant is made from two proteins in human blood that aid in coagulation. The proteins are freeze-dried onto a 4-inch by 4-inch bandage with an absorbable backing. When applied with direct pressure, the freeze-dried protein material on the bandage is pressed into the wound, where it quickly dissolves and coagulates. The pressure slows bleeding, and the high concentration of the proteins clots the blood in approximately 1 minute.

Research shows that the bandage can reduce blood loss by 50 to 85 percent and prevent shock associated with battlefield injuries. In far-forward areas, the bandages can be applied to wounded soldiers either by medics or other soldiers, greatly increasing a casualty's chances for survival.

The Red Cross plans to conduct clinical tests on the new bandage and seek approval of its use from the Food and Drug Administration within the next 3 years.

NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTERS TO MEET

The 48th Defense Working Group on Nondestructive Testing (DWG_NDT) will be held at the Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites, Historic District, Alexandria, Virginia, from 1 to 4 November.

Engineers, scientists, technicians, and managers from all commands and U.S. Government activities who are responsible for developing or applying NDT methods in research, engineering, maintenance, and quality assurance will attend. The meeting is hosted alternately by the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Defense Logistics Agency. This year it is hosted by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Maryland.

Those interested in presenting a problem or a technical paper at the conference may submit an abstract on line by visiting the DWG-NDT website, http://members.aol.com/dodndt/dodndt.html, by calling (301) 743-4152, or by sending e-mail to BurtchetteDE@ih.navy.mil).

ARMY DEVELOPS NEW BULLET

The Army has developed a new M16 round that has replaced the lead core with a tungsten and tin core. The new 5.56-millimeter bullets are ballistically and visually identical to the old ones, require no special handling, and have proven to be slightly more accurate than the lead rounds during testing.

The bullet was developed in an effort to reduce lead in the environment. With the new rounds, bullets fired on ranges will not contain lead that could leach into the soil. According to Jim Arnold, Chief of the Pollution Prevention and Environmental Technology Division at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, lead contamination is not currently a problem at outdoor military ranges. The Army is addressing the situation before it becomes a problem. \

The first million rounds will be produced at Lake City Army Ammunition Plant, Missouri, and will be available for troop use soon after production. Once the 5.56-millimeter rounds prove successful in actual field use, researchers will begin work on 7.62-millimeter, 9-millimeter, and .50-caliber tungsten-tin rounds.