JLOTS: Ship to Shore

    The Army and Navy conducted a joint logistics over-the-shore (JLOTS) operation at Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base, California, as part of Exercise Turbo Patriot in September 2000. The 143d Transportation Command, an Army Reserve headquarters from Orlando, Florida, oversaw the exercise. The 7th Transportation Group (Composite) from Fort Eustis, Virginia, the Navy's Amphibious GroupThree from San Diego, California, and the Military Sealift Command provided forces, ships, and equipment.

    Equipment belonging to the 25th Infantry Division (Light) from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, was loaded aboard the USNS Seay, a large, medium speed, roll-on-roll-off (LMSR) ship, at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and sailed to the California coast. There the equipment was downloaded in the open ocean and moved to a bare beach by Army and Navy lighters.

Equipment and vehicles are moved toward the shore using a causeway ferry.

Equipment and vehicles are moved toward the shore using a causeway ferry.

The Army's only floating causeway pier, called the Trident, is stabbed into the beach at Camp Pendleton, California.

The Army's only floating causeway pier, called the Trident, is stabbed into the beach at Camp Pendleton, California.

The Navy's elevated causeway is used to move cargo over the beach toward the staging areas.

The Navy's elevated causeway is used to move cargo over the beach toward the staging areas.

A landing craft-mechanized (LCM-8) pulls alongside the causeway ferry and roll-on-roll-off discharge facility, bringing a new crew shift to the watercraft to continue operations around the clock.

A landing craft-mechanized (LCM-8) pulls alongside the causeway ferry and roll-on-roll-off discharge facility, bringing a new crew shift to the watercraft to continue operations around the clock.

    Stevedores from the 567th Transportation Company of the 7th Transportation Group prepared cargo and moved it down the ship's roll-off ramp onto the Navy's floating roll-on-roll-off discharge facility, which was moored alongside the LMSR. The equipment then was driven aboard Army landing craft, utility, provided by the Army Reserve's 481st Transportation Company (Heavy Boat) from Mare Island, California, or onto causeway barge ferries belonging to the Amphibious Construction Battalion One (Seabees) from Coronado, California.
The roll-on-roll-off discharge facility is positioned alongside the LMSR to transfer equipment to an Army lighter for movement to the beach. The roll-on-roll-off discharge facility is positioned alongside the LMSR to transfer equipment to an Army lighter for movement to the beach. 

A 5-ton truck begins moving down the ramp of the LMSR USNS Seay to the roll-on-roll-off discharge facility. Convoys prepare to move the equipment to the NTC.
A 5-ton truck begins moving down the ramp of the LMSR USNS Seay to the roll-on-roll-off discharge facility.  Convoys prepare to move the equipment to the NTC.

    The containerized equipment moved toward the shore on lighters and was downloaded onto a 1,500-foot elevated causeway pier built by the Seabees. Causeway ferries that moved other equipment were operated by sailors and by soldiers from the 7th Transportation Group's 331st Transportation Company, the Army's only causeway unit. The 331st Transportation Company soldiers also constructed a 1,200-foot floating causeway pier in the open ocean from sections they assembled in the Del Mar boat basin. Then they sailed the causeway the 9 nautical miles to the shore, where it was beached and secured. The company maintained the floating pier throughout the operation despite the dangerous waves and 8- to 12-foot ocean swells that occurred day and night for 4 days.

    Once the equipment was on the shore, the 53d Movement Control Battalion from Fort McPherson, Georgia, supervised the loading of 176 wheeled vehicles, trailers, and engineer equipment on flatbed trucks for the 218-mile journey to the National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, for the 25th Infantry Division's rotation. The 169th Port Operations Cargo Detachment from Fort Eustis loaded, blocked, and tied down the equipment on the trailers. The 206th Medium Truck Company, an Army Reserve unit from Mobile, Alabama, transported the equipment from Camp Pendleton to the NTC.
The SS Chesapeake heels to one side and dumps the 750-ton single-anchor legmooring to the sea bottom, where it connects the ship to the underwater pipeline that carries petroleum to the beach. The SS Chesapeake heels to one side and dumps the 750-ton single-anchor legmooring to the sea bottom, where it connects the ship to the underwater pipeline that carries petroleum to the beach.
The Inland Petroleum Distribution System pumps seawater, simulating fuel products, into bladders for movement inland. The Inland Petroleum Distribution System pumps seawater, simulating fuel products, into bladders for movement inland. The Inland Petroleum Distribution System pumps seawater, simulating fuel products, into bladders for movement inland.
The Inland Petroleum Distribution System pumps seawater, simulating fuel products, into bladders for movement inland.

    During this exercise, soldiers and sailors also practiced interfacing the Army's and Navy's petroleum distribution systems. The SS Chesapeake pumped over 450,000 gallons of seawater, to simulate fuel, through the Navy's Offshore Petroleum Distribution System, operated by the Seabees of Amphibious Construction Battalion One, and into the Army's Inland Petroleum Distribution System, operated by the 19th Quartermaster Company from Fort Story, Virginia. The water then was pumped into the Marine Corps' amphibious assault bulk fuel system, where it was verified as clean and returned to the ocean.      ALOG

    The Army Logistician staff would like to thank Captain Sean M. Herron, the plans officer for the 7th Transportation Group (Composite) at Fort Eustis, Virginia, for providing information and photos for this article.